Humanitarian Intervention Thesis

Humanitarian Intervention Thesis

Many scholars have documented this problem, which arises because there is no duly constituted system of enforcement or police force for the world.So before presenting the five theses, a brief historical review is in order. But the idea of humanitarian intervention always needed a theoretical justification.Even before R2P was introduced at the United Nations in 2005, the main theoretical elements were already in place.Each case study is analysed with regards to the number of saved lives as a result of intervention as an indicator of short-term effectiveness, and with regards of the elimination of the political cause of violence as the long-term factor.The results of this research aims to determine the effectiveness of NATO’s future missions and to determine whether it is the right approach to undertake in the future.Important reference points in this policy discussion include the civil war in Syria; crises in the 1990s in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Rwanda, and Kosovo; and similar ones earlier in the twentieth century, such as the widespread slaughter of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire during the First World War, the destruction of European Jewry from 1939 to 1945, and the mass murders in Pol Pot’s Cambodia from 1975 to 1978.Political and moral catastrophes such as these raise many questions about state sovereignty, the purpose and efficacy of international institutions, and strategies to avoid similar outcomes in the future.The debate whether humanitarian interventions are effective in resolving conflict and saving lives and are not purely based on national interest of intervening states, triggered the research question of this thesis: Was NATO’s humanitarian military intervention effective in the cases of Kosovo (1999) and Libya (2011) in terms of achieving short and long-term humanitarian benefits?This question will be answered by looking at each scenario through the focus on the short and long-term effectiveness of NATO’s missions.As a sovereign nation with formidable military power, it is tempting to think that the United States can “go at it alone” and undertake humanitarian military interventions by itself.The idea is flawed, but it is crucial to understand its genesis and development and why some people still embrace it. Scholars such as Gary Bass and Alan Dowd have shown that humanitarian intervention has a surprisingly long history in the West and the United States, going back to the nineteenth century.[1] In the US, that history was largely forgotten during the Cold War, when both the United States and the Soviet Union competed for allies around the globe.

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