Orwell Politics And The English Language Thesis

Orwell Politics And The English Language Thesis-83
That shows how prose consists of words that aren't necessarily chosen for their meaning, but instead just because it's easy.In Paragraph 12, Orwell uses a similie to compare someone "choking" to "tea leaves blocking a sink", which shows how the author knows what he wants to say, but sometimes he has too many "stale phrases" in his head. Licensed under CC Attribution Share Alike 2.0 license" data-lightbox="media-gallery-1567787960"In paragraph 15, Orwell uses a similie to compare "a mass of Latin words fall upon the facts" to "soft snow", which blurs the outlines, and covers up the details.

Tags: Usc Film Application EssayAnd SythesisIb Chemistry Coursework Mark SchemeEquality In Canada EssayDissertation On BrandingWhy Are Big Fierce Animals Rare EssayConcise Business PlanCollege Papers Reports Essays Book FairEssays On Vampire LiteratureWhirligig The Book Essay

When the Voice of Britain is heard at nine o'clock, better far and infinitely less ludicrous to hear aitches honestly dropped than the present priggish, inflated, inhibited, school-ma'amish arch braying of blameless bashful mewing maidens!

Letter in Tribune Each of these passages has faults of its own, but, quite apart from avoidable ugliness, two qualities are common to all of them.

It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to aeroplanes.

Underneath this lies the half-conscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes.

I number them so that I can refer back to them when necessary: 1.

I am not, indeed, sure whether it is not true to say that the Milton who once seemed not unlike a seventeenth-century Shelley had not become, out of an experience ever more bitter in each year, more alien [sic] to the founder of that Jesuit sect which nothing could induce him to tolerate.

Other words used in variable meanings, in most cases more or less dishonestly, are: class, totalitarian, science, progressive, reactionary, bourgeois, equality.” Orwell continues: “In our time, political speech and writing are largely the defense of the indefensible....

Thus political language has to consist largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness.” In our time, too.

“Words of this kind are often used in a consciously dishonest way....

Statements like Marshal Pétain was a true patriot, The Soviet press is the freest in the world, The Catholic Church is opposed to persecution, are almost always made with intent to deceive.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Orwell Politics And The English Language Thesis

The Latest from gruzmashvlad.ru ©